In the spring of 2020, when the world shifted to remote working, organizations from every vertical turned to video as a means to connect and share messages in lieu of in-person meetings. For the B2B sector, video became a lifeline to prospective buyers and customers. So it should come as no surprise that Vidyard, a leading video platform for marketing and sales video hosting, saw a 400% increase in the number of weekly signups for its free product with the first two weeks of quarantine.

In this episode, host Justin Gray chats with Tyler Lessard, VP of Marketing at Vidyard, about the surge in personalized videos, how marketing and sales teams are leveraging video, and how video is shaping the future of B2B sales. They also discuss how Vidyard managed the sudden, enormous spike in business, the ways the team adjusted its focus and what inspired Tyler’s recent book, The Visual Sale.

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3 Key Points:

1. The use of video is exploding in B2B and beyond. With two weeks of COVID-19’s onset and the shift to remote work, Vidyard saw a massive spike in the number of weekly signups for its free product – and not all from B2B organizations. The ability to connect via video in personalized ways appealed far beyond those the business world, which is a reminder of one key thing: building authentic connections matters, no matter who you are or what you do.

2. There’s a democratization of video. Sales and marketing teams have a number of different mediums to deliver their messages. Text, images and audio are their usual go-tos, but increasingly, teams are being empowered to record and share quick videos with prospects. Why? Video is simply a great way to communicate any message and organizations want to leverage that. Examples include sharing videos on social, prospecting with one-to-one videos, recording quick demos or even recording a walk through of a sales proposal.

3. Video is shaping the future of selling. Becoming a helpful resource and providing value are two key ways to strengthen relationships and your personal brand. That’s why there’s an increasing trend of sales reps leveraging video on social media platforms like LinkedIn to build trust and credibility, and to generate their own inbound demand. 

Time Stamped Show Notes:

2:09 – What’s your day-to-day like at Vidyard right now?

3:53 – What was Vidyard focusing on before COVID-19 ?

6:30 – When everything shifted to remote work in Spring 2020, how was Vidyard immediately impacted?

9:28 – Was there a plan to convert these new users to be long-term successful clients?

11:58 – What drove the Vidyard team to plan for this growth so far ahead of time?

14:49 – What is the future for personalized video from a sales and marketing standpoint?

17:32 – What inspired your book, “The Visual Sale”?

19:40 – How will video impact the future seller?

22:34– What was your catalyst moment?

26:18 – Lightning round

32:44 – Wrap-Up: Find Tyler on LinkedIn.

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Full Transcript

Justin Gray:

Hey, hello, again, you’re back on Catalyst. Season three is well underway. And another guest who I think we’ve had on video series and stuff like that in the past, but certainly never under the topic today. And with what was such a crazy year, certainly a great year to talk about catalytic stories and what we’ve all been overcoming here in 2020. So, I’m glad and proud, happy, humbled, honored to welcome Tyler Lessard to the show. Tyler’s, of course, the VP of Marketing over at Vidyard, a great solution, a longtime partner. So Tyler, welcome to the show.

Tyler Lessard:

Hey, thanks Justin. It is great to be here and particularly at this time when we’re going through so much change in marketing and sales. So lots of great things to talk about. Appreciate you having me.

Justin Gray:

Yeah, speaking of change, we were joking before we started here, Tyler, his new book, and is this the first book that you’ve written at this point?

Tyler Lessard:

This is. This is my first book, so it is a huge change for me, both professionally and personally, to hit this milestone, to have my first book out there in the wild, fully authored. Despite being the video guy, I still do believe in the written word and physical media. So super excited to have this out there, my friend.

Justin Gray:

Absolutely. Yeah. So now we can tag the author in the tagline there as well.

Tyler Lessard:

That’s right.

Justin Gray:

And of course, the book, The Visual Sale, we’ll get into that. You guys obviously do a ton of stuff from a visual standpoint. And from what we’ve seen, organizations that are embracing not only video, but personalized video within this era to where we are now, all inside digital sellers are really those that are sticking head and shoulders above the rest of the competition.

Justin Gray:

So before we get started, just give us a little bit of a lay of the land, certainly in these times what your day-to-day looks like, what your responsibilities are over there at Vidyard.

Tyler Lessard:

Yeah, it’s been an interesting year I think for all of us, of course, as we’re continuously, frankly, literally every week, every month evolving what we are doing in our go-to-market programs here. I have responsibility over our marketing programs and I spend most of my time focused on our thought leadership, our in-market presence, our corporate communications, community building. And partnering with great people out there in the community who are helping clients learn, discover, and find new solutions in these times of change.

Tyler Lessard:

And it’s actually been really interesting because we continue to find, of course, a lot of great success with our own general marketing programs, our own outbound selling programs. We’ve, of course, shifted more and more to digital, obviously. We’re doing a lot of great webinars, virtual events, all the things you might expect. But we’re finding an increasing amount of success by partnering with those who are trusted sources to their clients. Whether they be marketing agencies, sales trainers, sales consultants, other folks who have captive communities out there, and partnering with them to get our message down to their clients, and to help their clients during this time of change.

Tyler Lessard:

And I feel like that’s been such a core part of our process now because of how important that trust factor is in today’s market. And that I think more and more businesses are continuing to come back to those people that have helped them before and leverage their guidance as they continue to change in this new era.

Justin Gray:

Yeah, absolutely. So I have to imagine this has just been a huge catalytic event for Vidyard in general. Maybe talk a little bit about how that’s manifested itself. And I know specifically, the average user of the Vidyard solution has changed dramatically, or increased dramatically, really, I should say. So tell us a little bit about that.

Tyler Lessard:

You’re absolutely right. And this is indicative of a bigger shift that’s happening in the market, which is what really gets me excited. So, here at Vidyard, we’re about 10 years old as an organization. And for our first, let’s call it seven to eight years, we were focused on being a video hosting, management, publishing and analytics platform for marketing teams. And so we’ve always had great relationships and worked very closely with the Marketos and Eloquas and Salesforces of the world. And continue to see great growth in that video hosting side of our business.

Tyler Lessard:

But about two to three years ago, we introduced our solution to make it very easy for sales reps to, not only access and send out those videos from their marketing team, but what is now more important, the ability for them to record and send personalized videos, one-to-one videos in a way that was seamless, simple, and just a natural part of their day-to-day communication. One click from their email to record, one click to send.

Tyler Lessard:

And this started off as a bit of a novelty and a neat little product, but it has now surged into being our top performer in terms of a solution in the market. And this year specifically, we have seen a massive surge in sales teams adopting tools like this. Not only because everybody is now an inside seller and they’re all selling virtually, but I think it’s also because we all know we’re competing with so much noise, even more noise than ever with email and social and others.

Tyler Lessard:

And those that are starting to send one-to-one videos continue to report much higher response rates, higher show rates, and then they’re using video recordings throughout the rest of their process. So, it’s been really exciting to see that, and it is the shifting dynamic of, video is no longer just a marketing technology. In fact, I think it’s even more important right now in the sales process.

Justin Gray:

Yeah. We’ve had folks on the show that obviously were involved in businesses that were impacted in a really negative way, whether it’s the market that they served or events organizations. I mean, geez, they’ve just been completely overhauled. You guys are a bit on the other end of that spectrum. And you mentioned that this was, I don’t know if I’d term it a happy accident, but it’s certainly taken off with the new product more than you guys had expected. What were some of the ramifications that you saw with also the massive amount of new interest that you saw coming in as a result of COVID?

Tyler Lessard:

Yeah. Well, it’s a great question because you’re right in that we did see a significant increase in demand. And frankly, it happened very quickly. In fact, when we went into lockdown in North America, which generally happened in late March for most of us, in a matter of two weeks we had a 400% increase in the number of weekly signups for our free product. Up 400%. So it was like five X, it was crazy. And that held through consistently week over week after that. So it’s a good problem to have, of course, a lot more demand, but at the same time, frankly, I was certainly very worried of what might happen on the other side of that with the increasing expectations for support and so on.

Tyler Lessard:

But what I would say and what I’ve learned in having gone through this, is thankfully, we had been building things ahead of this to be ready, to grow and to surge. We’re always built as a growth organization and thinking about how do we scale our presence in the market efficiently, effectively, and using technology wisely? And I’ll give you a perfect example of how this has all played out. We, like many businesses, have spent a lot of time thinking about how we use all the data and insights on our prospects, on our customers, behind the scenes? How do we mine all that data, understand what these different individuals look like, what segments they fit into, what their needs are? And use that information to then guide who it is that we are focusing our marketing and sales programs against. Who’s getting which messaging at what time?

Tyler Lessard:

And that absolutely saved us in this process because that four to five X increase in number of users, not all of those were our marketing and sales traditional base. We had a whole bunch of teachers and students starting to sign up for the tool as a way to record and send out video assignments, to respond to videos, do assignments with video.

Tyler Lessard:

And again, thankfully, we had the orchestration on the backend to help us learn what these different users looked like. And to make sure that we could easily segment them and not start promoting our next video selling guide to my 13 year old daughter, who’s now a Vidyard user because she uses it school. So it’s really interesting. And again, thankful that we got ahead of that curve and made sure the systems were in place to help us scale some of this efficiently.

Justin Gray:

Yeah. You guys have really two really interesting levers there, right? Number one, you’ve got the freemium model. So you’ve got to convert those users into hopefully a paying user on the platform. And then you’ve got this maturity lever as well. I’m sure the quality and the effectiveness of the videos that folks create is largely going to determine their desire to keep utilizing that channel and really build it in as part of their consistent mix. What did you guys do in those regards to, again, ensure that you’re bringing those guys on as long-term clients and successful clients?

Tyler Lessard:

Well, this has been a 18 month learning process for us in shifting from what was traditionally a top-down enterprise sales model into a PLG, or product-led growth or freemium style of offering. And we continue to have both. We absolutely are selling top-down directly into enterprise and businesses. But as you mentioned, we now have a freemium product which enables a very low barrier of entry for individual sales reps, for individual marketers who are looking for a quick way to get on board.

Tyler Lessard:

And that has genuinely transformed the way that we market and sell today and build products. Thankfully, all for the better now that we’ve gotten through those awkward teenager years where we weren’t really quite sure what we were, and we didn’t have everything orchestrated. But now that we’re all in, it has fundamentally shifted, again, how we use data on the backend. How we try to use product usage data complemented with persona-based data, with demographic, firmographic information based on those users to start to identify potential prospects that we can move up to our sales team.

Tyler Lessard:

Again, as the marketer here at Vidyard, we continue to shift more and more from marketing qualified leads to product qualified leads. So our marketing leads we are driving to start in the product. And then we’re analyzing their usage. We’re looking for cohorts of users within the same organization. And all of those signals are now feeding our lead scoring and getting people primed and ready for our sales team. And it’s a really interesting model, and one that’s starting to now become a real flywheel for us.

Tyler Lessard:

And most importantly, we’ve finally gotten our sales team on board, which I think as many people can appreciate, when you move to a freemium or product-led growth, and you have an existing salesforce that’s used to book a demo as your main call to action, it’s hard. But they’re now at the point where they’re using it, they’re seeing these leads are more qualified, the people that are already users. And they’re also driving prospects to just start with the free product, and then I’ll follow up with you in a few weeks to see how you like it. So it’s really been a game changer for us, to be honest.

Justin Gray:

Yeah. There’s something to be said for that drug dealer model, right?

Tyler Lessard:

Absolutely.

Justin Gray:

And so you mentioned this has been an 18 month transformation. Obviously, that’s well beyond the confines of COVID. What prompted you guys to start going down this path and planning for that type of growth in scale? I’m sure there’s a lot of intentionality that goes into that. But at the same time there were folks that were making plans prior to COVID that really did change their entire world and they found out they didn’t have that foresight. So, how did you guys put your finger on what buttons should be pushed at such an early stage?

Tyler Lessard:

Yeah, in hindsight, again, it was very fortuitous in terms of the timing for us to have done this, because to your point, as we moved into lockdown this has now become a huge growth lever for us, including for those businesses who don’t have budget to buy new technology who can now become users.

Tyler Lessard:

So, if you rewind about two years ago, this very much came top down as an organization. Our executive team, we work as a very tight-knit group. And I think for any business having that executive leadership team where marketing, sales, product, of course, CEO, CTO, are all active, not just a quarterly get together, let’s build the board deck. But are genuinely on a weekly basis collaborating on strategy and how you do it holistically across the organization.

Tyler Lessard:

And again, about two years ago we started the conversations around the shift in the market. And thankfully it really did come from our CEO and CTO who had been looking at the spaces, had been looking at other successful technologies in similar veins, and how they buy products and use products today. And I think we all agreed when we said, “Hey, the future for most technology is I can try, I can use, and then I can buy.” And very few people are adopting new technology without using it first upfront.

Tyler Lessard:

And so there was an early commitment to say, “This is where things are heading. We need to intercept that. And we can’t be a laggard in this. We need to embrace it.” And the most difficult part of all of this was… Or getting that alignment across the different organizations on how this was all going to play out. Because moving to this was a full shift in our business model and it involved product as much as it involved finance, as sales, as marketing. And again, if we didn’t have such a strong integration between those teams at that time, it would have been much more than an 18 month transition, and I don’t think we would be over the finish line yet today.

Justin Gray:

Right, right. So let’s talk about video in general, because certainly, marketers are great at finding a shiny object and dogpiling onto it. And then suddenly it’s no longer the thing to do any longer because there really isn’t a maturity curve that follows that. It’s just, I’m trying to be where no one’s at. Suddenly everyone’s over there and now I’m looking for the latest new thing. What do you think the future of personalized video is from a sales and marketing standpoint? What are the organizations and your clients that are using video effectively, what are they doing differently than everyone else?

Tyler Lessard:

Well, I think a really big thing that I’m seeing, which is interesting, is this shift in mentality from video is a technology, or video as a channel to, video is a way to communicate my message. And it’s as simple as that. And we all know now that we’re on Zooms all day long. That, of course, video is this medium to allow me to deliver a more personal or more effective communication. And nobody’s going to argue that it’s the next best thing to being there in person, of course. If we could be there in person, absolutely we would.

Tyler Lessard:

And so I think for a lot of us in marketing and sales, it’s now getting behind this notion of, if I have a message to communicate to my base, whether it’s something on my website, whether it’s something I’m sending one-to-one via an email, whether it’s something that’s part of an account-based marketing program, I have different mediums I can use to deliver that message. I have texts, I have images, I have visuals, I have audio podcasts, I have video.

Tyler Lessard:

And we haven’t been taught as business professionals to think that way traditionally. Video was never one of those options because it was always expensive and difficult and something that was more of an advertising, let alone people being able to view it. But the last decade, of course, now we all have the ability to stream videos immediately.

Tyler Lessard:

So we’re at that point now where it’s super accessible and people are just starting to tap into that and say, “Hey, if I can start to create a culture where my sales reps can record and send a quick video and they’re confident doing it. And they’re set up for success. They’ve got decent lighting, they’ve got a good camera, which they need anyways. And I can teach them how to build this into their sales process and make it a natural part of the way they communicate.

Tyler Lessard:

The same thing in marketing. Getting more and more people having an in-house video producer is so amazing if you can do it right now, but it’s not just about that. You can empower different people in your team to record and share quick videos, or it could be longer videos that again, just don’t need the level of production we traditionally had. And I think that’s the real change that we’re seeing, is this democratization of video. And this acceptance, and in fact, in many cases, preference of our audiences for more authentic, simpler, more genuine content. And that’s what’s really going on right now.

Justin Gray:

Yeah. I think you hit it on the head there. The production value, that’s a nice to have these days. People want actionable value, something that they can take away and is going to help them in whatever that particular pain point or whatever they’re trying to enhance.

Justin Gray:

And that’s really the crux of The Visual Sale, as I understand as well, right? Again, I haven’t gotten my hands on it yet, but I’m looking forward to doing so. But it’s all about creating that, again, maturity in the market and just helping people embrace this in a way that does stand out because of the unique content and not the wrapper around that, right?

Tyler Lessard:

Yeah, no, you’re spot on. And one of the things we felt was really important in The Visual Sale was to, not only talk about video in different marketing programs and how can you tap into the power of video in your digital marketing, your account-based marketing, email marketing? Or how to use video in your sales process effectively with lots of examples.

Tyler Lessard:

But also there’s a significant part that is dedicated to building that culture of video and saying, “If I’m in on this, if I’m sitting here, I’m smiling, I’m nodding going, of course my sales reps should be able to record and send personalized videos. And of course my marketing team should be using videos as part of their email marketing more and more on our website.” And so on. Then you start to say, “But how do I actually really do it?” Because most businesses aren’t ready to make that a reality.

Tyler Lessard:

And so there is a shift in terms of understanding the technologies that can be used to make this easy. But more about it, honestly, really is a cultural shift in saying this is going to be a way that we’re all going to communicate messages in different ways going forward, and helping people in your organization embrace that. Living it yourself as a leader, sending out your internal communications with videos instead of hiding behind the keyboard and hoping people are reading it.

Tyler Lessard:

And I think whether or not right now, you’re like, “This is something I need to do right now.” If you’re not starting down that journey and in 2021, 2022, you’re not at the point where you can comfortably create and share videos, you’re going to be, honestly, you’re going to be so far behind, and I think just now is the time to get going with it.

Justin Gray:

Yeah. There’s a bigger trend at play there, and we hear a bunch about it. Marketing needs to operate more like sales and sales really needs to be creating content and acting more like a traditional, or some of those functions in a traditional marketing department. What are your thoughts on that? What’s the future seller look like? They’ve got all these different content creation tools. They’re building personal brands in a way that we never saw before. How’s that transforming the profession of sales?

Tyler Lessard:

It is so interesting, Justin, as I look at what is really happening out there. And a lot of this is still, it’s just the bleeding edge of sellers that are really getting behind these shifts. But it really is interesting to see how social media platforms are transforming the way that sellers, not only sell, but to your point, build their personal brand, earn credibility in the market and actually generate inbound demand for themselves. I absolutely love that.

Tyler Lessard:

And I see folks on your team, I see folks on my team. I see others out there who are sales leaders and sales contributors who are out there sharing weekly, in some cases, daily updates, tips, ideas. And they don’t always have to be the most revolutionary. Sometimes they come from, “I had a really interesting conversation with a customer this morning who was trying this and they figured out this really interesting idea to do this. I thought the rest of you might learn from it.” It’s like getting into that mode of being open, transparent, and being helpful.

Tyler Lessard:

And so I think there’s a huge trend there to reps being helpful contributors as a way of earning their trust and credibility in their market and generating their own inbound demand. I think there’s absolutely more and more use of tools like video, that they can become more visual, personal human sellers right from the get-go. Whether that’s sharing videos on social, whether it’s prospecting with one-to-one videos, whether it’s using it throughout the process to record a quick demo, to record a walk through of a sales proposal.

Tyler Lessard:

So I absolutely think tools like social, video, chat, we hear all these things as big buzzwords. But the smartest sales reps are really leaning into those and going, “Yeah, you know what? I can use these to rebuild how it is I sell when I can’t be out there taking somebody out for dinner all the time, or going to an event and meeting people on the show floor.” There’s all these new digital ways to build those relationships, and I think that’s a huge part of the future of selling.

Justin Gray:

Yeah. It wasn’t that long ago, and I’m sure there are still organizations that started with this, but to where, if you were a seller and you weren’t pounding the phones, or you weren’t prospecting communications, you were failing at that job. And to see the shift into some of those longer term plays where, to your point, brand building and ensuring that when someone picks up the phone they feel good about sharing their time with that seller. Because they know they’re going to get something of value out of it, even if it’s not specifically that product at that time. So yeah, I think that and the education that comes along with it, the value that comes along with it is extremely positive.

Justin Gray:

So, let’s zoom out a bit because we talk only really all about change on this show. And organizations and folks like yourself that are constantly trying to look around corners and are open to doing things in new ways to try and stay ahead of that curve, getting engaged with the client. And just understanding how that’s going to drive themselves for being open to that change.

Justin Gray:

I find that they tend to have some interesting backstory there. So you have something where either someone helped them understand the power of that catalytic thinking, or someone that they’ve learned from that opened their eyes to a different way of approaching situations. So I’m curious, have you had one of those catalysts in your life or a catalytic moment that sticks out that maybe shifted your train of thought?

Tyler Lessard:

Yeah. My career has been a pretty constant change, to be honest. I am a engineering graduate from university, and I started as a software developer in my career. I was certainly not a marketer and certainly not a business executive. And I started my career at Blackberry. Some of you may remember the inventors of the smartphone.

Justin Gray:

That’s right.

Tyler Lessard:

A very exciting time and place where I was.

Justin Gray:

The wheel.

Tyler Lessard:

I started as a software developer. Was not a good software developer. But I tested different things and I found I was a great customer service kind of person. And my initial role, I actually shifted, thanks to support from my leader at the time, from doing day-to-day developer activities into working with a community of third-party developers and acting as a developer relations manager, if you will. And this was the early days of mobile apps development. So it was super fun, actually. I got to work with people building literally the very first mobile web browsers and things like that. This was like 130 years ago or something.

Tyler Lessard:

But what happened from there is I found that I was very strong at that relationship management, at the communication side of things, where other technical folks weren’t. And I personally leaned into that. And I do remember one of my catalyst moments was the opportunity to present and keynote our developer conferences in the early days, and specifically our very first developer conference that we hosted. And as a young buck, fairly fresh out of school, all of a sudden now I’m on stage in front of hundreds of people, with years later, it became thousands of people. It was an amazing opportunity. And while a lot of people would have been very nervous and struggled, I really enjoyed it. And my leaders were there and they recognized that, “Hey, this is a path that you can have a real impact in.”

Tyler Lessard:

And that led me down the journey of becoming much more of an evangelist for our platform. I ended up running a business development team that was building out partnerships around the world. And ended my career at Blackberry as VP of Global Alliances. And it was really that moment where again, both myself, I embraced the opportunity to try something. But having a leader that was also able to give me that opportunity and then push me in that direction and saying, “You know what? Don’t look back over here. This is your trajectory.”` And having leaders like that is priceless in your career.

Justin Gray:

Yeah, it definitely says something about the environment where someone can see that raw skillset and say, “Hey, let’s not worry about the quality of your code, let’s actually take you in a completely different direction.” I think most of us have been very fortunate to work around and with people like that in our lives, and also focus on passing that forward on a day-to-day basis as well.

Tyler Lessard:

Yeah.

Justin Gray:

So as we wrap up here, we always do this, what we call rapid insights, some quick fire questions, just to maybe stimulate the thinking and get some info that you don’t normally see on these types of shows. So if you don’t mind, we’ll pivot over into that portion of the show. And I always find this is an interesting question, certainly in today’s day and age, but where do you go for news and new information? I guess what I’m really asking there is where do you go for information that you trust?

Tyler Lessard:

I was going to ask that, real information or not? It’s funny, I’ll use this as a chance to emphasize if you haven’t heard it already in my accent, I am a Canadian. I am based just outside of Toronto here, North of the border. And I frankly have always been a great fan of our Canadian Broadcast Corporation, the CBC. And as cliche as it may sound, it is one of those mostly unbiased news outlets that we are proud to have here in Canada. And it’s always my go-to source in the morning. But I certainly do use social media significantly, but like all of us, I have a very discerning eye and make sure that anything I’m looking at I can take with a grain of salt.

Justin Gray:

Maybe along those same lines, what’s your guilty pleasure?

Tyler Lessard:

My guilty pleasure. You know what? This has emerged fairly recently, and this may sound self-serving because I’m the video guy. But over the last year or two, I’ve really leaned into this notion of, I need to be creating more and more video myself and exercising my skills here, because I genuinely believe this is a skill set of the future. And I have been doing a ton of my own video creation, editing on the side. Frankly, spending way too much time on it. My wife will sometimes come into my office room here and it’ll be like two in the morning, and like, “What the hell are you doing?” And here I am producing a Halloween video with my 11 year old son, which I just did this year.

Justin Gray:

I was going to say, I see a ton of the content that you create with your kids. It’s great.

Tyler Lessard:

Yeah. So that’s a lot of fun and I don’t feel too guilty about it because I think it’s a skill I need to build anyways. But it has become a real pleasure and it’s really enjoyable, and being able to let out that creative side. I encourage all of you to try it. If you’re not doing basic video editing, take a quick course, watch something on YouTube and try making a little fun holiday video this year or whatever it happens to be.

Justin Gray:

Still one of my favorite classes in college, video production. What’s one thing you would change about yourself if you could.

Tyler Lessard:

The one thing I always think about is I wish I were more ambitious and less risk averse, if you will, which will surprise some people.

Justin Gray:

I was going to say, that is surprising.

Tyler Lessard:

… in my career. But honestly, I recognize I am generally a risk averse person. It’s just part of my nature. And left to my own devices I will often go down the easiest path that will present itself. And which is why I’m grateful that I have had many people in my career and in my personal life that I can very clearly see when and where they push me out of my comfort zone, push me in a new direction, push to try something new, push me to recognize good enough isn’t good enough sometimes. And so I’m thankful for that. But I try to recognize it. And I’ve been trying my best to continue to push myself to take more risks where it’s warranted.

Justin Gray:

Yeah. Risks are fun, man. If you ever want classes on risks I can probably get some. So we talked a bit about some great jobs that you’ve had in the past. To wrap this up, what’s the worst job that you’ve ever had?

Tyler Lessard:

Oh, the worst job that I had was in university as an engineering student. It was a terrific cooperative program there, which I had some great co-op jobs and a couple that weren’t so great. And the one that stands out was working at a large, it was one of the big three systems integrators, consulting companies. And I joined there, I spent eight months there in their team working on technology projects, largely database technology projects for clients.

Tyler Lessard:

And what I learned there, what I really gathered a distaste for, to be honest, was in that environment there was a complete lack of camaraderie and team-based success and motivation. And it may have been the team I was in, I don’t know. But every day it reeked of that person’s in it for their own thing, that person’s in it for their own thing, and that guy’s just trying to build up his resume for the next job that he’s trying to get as a consultant. And it really left a bad taste in my mouth. And thankfully, I know that not all agencies and integrators operate in that way. But yeah, it was one of those ones that I’m happy I had that experience as a co-op student because it took me in a different direction when I graduated and focused on my main career.

Justin Gray:

Yeah. That context is everything. And it also speaks to just how critical, what we call culture, but real culture, how critical that is to just day-to-day enjoyment and loving getting up in the morning.

Tyler Lessard:

Yeah.

Justin Gray:

So, Tyler, as we close out, where do you like people to connect with you? Are you a social guy, email guy, where can folks get a hold of you?

Tyler Lessard:

Yeah. Connect with me on LinkedIn, Tyler Lessard at Vidyard. You’ll find me there. Send me a message, say hello. Send me a video and I’d be happy to send you one back. So you can hit me up there. And, of course, as you mentioned earlier, you can check out my new book, The Visual Sale. You can find that at thevisualsale.com. You can check out my LinkedIn profile, there’s a link there as well.

Justin Gray:

Is it on Amazon right now?

Tyler Lessard:

It is absolutely on Amazon. And then let me know, if you do end up getting a copy, let me know what you honestly think. Connect with me on LinkedIn. I am always curious to see how it lands with different folks. So, check it out.

Justin Gray:

Hey, man, thanks so much for joining us here today. I really appreciate you being the guest on the show. For those folks listening out there, don’t forget to subscribe, please. That’s what drives this whole show. And of course, if you want to check out past episodes of Catalyst, you can do so at leadmd.com/best practices. Until next time, never miss a chance to be inspired.

 

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